Posts tagged esther's children

463 notes

touba:


Jewish dervishes Agha-Jaan Darvish and his brother, patriarchs of the Darvish family. Tehran, Iran, c.1922.
“Because of its specific association with Sufism and its ensuing identification with Islam, dervishhood is an order comprised almost exclusively of Muslim practicioners. The two Jewish dervishes pictured here in this rare photograph are among the very few who had successfully been integrated into the order without converting to Islam. Like the Jewish practitioners of a traditional Iranian sport in the houses of strength (zurkhaneh) — a sport that is profoundly intertwined with Islamic ritual — these dervishes represent a uniquely Iranian hybrid of Judaism and Islam.
Each of the Jewish dervishes seen here is displaying emblematic accoutrements of dervishhood: 1) The cloak, an outward sign of his state. 2) A kashkul (begging bowl) often made of such materials as mother-of-pearl. 3) A gourd, a coconut shell, or carved wood suspended from the wrist by a chain. 4) A tabarzin (short axe or hatchet) carried in the right hand and intended to fend off wild animals or highway robbers. 5) A chanta (patched bag) slung over the shoulder to carry essential items. 6) Takht-e pust (skin bed), a small mat made of animal skin that served as his bed while traveling. 7) A long rosary.”

Photograph and caption from Esther’s Children: A Portrait of Iranian Jews, edited by Houman Sarshar.

touba:

Jewish dervishes Agha-Jaan Darvish and his brother, patriarchs of the Darvish family. Tehran, Iran, c.1922.

“Because of its specific association with Sufism and its ensuing identification with Islam, dervishhood is an order comprised almost exclusively of Muslim practicioners. The two Jewish dervishes pictured here in this rare photograph are among the very few who had successfully been integrated into the order without converting to Islam. Like the Jewish practitioners of a traditional Iranian sport in the houses of strength (zurkhaneh) — a sport that is profoundly intertwined with Islamic ritual — these dervishes represent a uniquely Iranian hybrid of Judaism and Islam.

Each of the Jewish dervishes seen here is displaying emblematic accoutrements of dervishhood: 1) The cloak, an outward sign of his state. 2) A kashkul (begging bowl) often made of such materials as mother-of-pearl. 3) A gourd, a coconut shell, or carved wood suspended from the wrist by a chain. 4) A tabarzin (short axe or hatchet) carried in the right hand and intended to fend off wild animals or highway robbers. 5) A chanta (patched bag) slung over the shoulder to carry essential items. 6) Takht-e pust (skin bed), a small mat made of animal skin that served as his bed while traveling. 7) A long rosary.”

Photograph and caption from Esther’s Children: A Portrait of Iranian Jews, edited by Houman Sarshar.

(via ayatollahofsass)

Filed under iranian-jews dervishes esther's children iran

7 notes

badesaba:

“Esther’s Children : a Portrait of Iranian Jews”
by Houman Sarshar
Esther did not reveal her people or her kindred, for Mordecai had told her not to reveal it. (Esther 2:10)

“Since their liberation from Babylonian captivity by the Persian king Cyrus the Great in the 6th century B.C., the story of Iran’s Jews has been a fascinating but little-known element of the patchwork history of the Middle East. Esther’s Children covers every aspect of this ancient family of Jews, tracing it from the Achaemenid Empire to the diaspora of 1979.”

badesaba:

“Esther’s Children : a Portrait of Iranian Jews”

by Houman Sarshar

Esther did not reveal her people or her kindred, for Mordecai had told her not to reveal it. (Esther 2:10)


Since their liberation from Babylonian captivity by the Persian king Cyrus the Great in the 6th century B.C., the story of Iran’s Jews has been a fascinating but little-known element of the patchwork history of the Middle East. Esther’s Children covers every aspect of this ancient family of Jews, tracing it from the Achaemenid Empire to the diaspora of 1979.”

Filed under esther's children houman sarshar book cover history iranian jews

105 notes

touba:


Kāhen family. The mahalleh in Golpaygan, 1941. Rabbi Shemu’il Kāhen (third person from left) was educated in Iraq. He was the head rabbi in Golpaygan. The photograph was taken in his personal library, which is only partially visible here. The books, all in Hebrew, were brought to Iran from Iraq on camel back. The men’s hand gesture — a gesture used by the Cohanim during the priestly benediction in the synagogue in front of the arc — signifies their status as Cohanim. The men on either side of Rabbi Shemu’il are his sons. The child is his grandson.

Photograph from Esther’s Children: A Portrait of Iranian Jews, edited by Houman Sarshar.

touba:

Kāhen family. The mahalleh in Golpaygan, 1941. Rabbi Shemu’il Kāhen (third person from left) was educated in Iraq. He was the head rabbi in Golpaygan. The photograph was taken in his personal library, which is only partially visible here. The books, all in Hebrew, were brought to Iran from Iraq on camel back. The men’s hand gesture — a gesture used by the Cohanim during the priestly benediction in the synagogue in front of the arc — signifies their status as Cohanim. The men on either side of Rabbi Shemu’il are his sons. The child is his grandson.

Photograph from Esther’s Children: A Portrait of Iranian Jews, edited by Houman Sarshar.

Filed under iranian-jews esther's children libraries somehow this photograph makes me sad iran books and things